Vegan Chocolate Chip Cookies

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I consider myself a bit of a chocolate chip cookie aficionado. Once, my friend and I made 7 different chocolate chip cookie recipes in the span of 2 days because we wanted the find The Ultimate Chocolate Chip Cookie (our winner? Serious Eats chocolate chip cookie).

The point is, I’m not speaking lightly when I say these chocolate chip cookies are indistinguishable from their non vegan counterparts. They have the soft, melty centers, crispy edges, and lightly caramelized flavor that I originally thought were inherent to the egg-and-butter cookies.

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This recipe makes 20 massive bakery-style cookies (or approx 4 dozen more reasonably sized cookies), but I’m fully in support of double-batches if your mixer/arms/health can handle it.

The secret to these cookies is aquafaba, otherwise known as the liquid found in cans of garbanzo beans/chickpeas! Aquafaba is actually a fairly recent fad in the food blogging world, because it turns out that aquafaba can imitate egg
whites almost perfectly.  In this recipe, aquafaba is used to replace entire eggs, but it steps up to the job with zero hesitation.

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One tip I have is to cream the shortening and sugar at medium to low speed. I’ve found that creaming butter and sugar until extremely fluffy works well for making light batters, but can make cookies a bit cakey and dry. In my opinion, it’s an absolute tragedy when this happens so I tend to err on the side of gentle creaming.

Besides that, these cookies are very simple to make, and follow the exact same process as most chocolate chip cookies. The dough was a little crumbly, which I was originally worried about, but baked up just fine. For gooey middles I baked the dough for 13-15 minutes, and for more chewy cookies I upped the time to 17 minutes. Both were delicious.

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Anyhow, onto the recipe!

Vegan Chocolate Chip Cookies

Lightly adapted from Smitten Kitchen

  • 1 ¼ cups (2 ½ sticks, 10 ounces, 280 grams) earth balance shortening, slightly colder than room temperature
  • 1 ¼ cups (240 grams) light brown sugar
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons (225 grams) white sugar
  • 6 tablespoons aquafaba (liquid from can of unsalted garbanzo beans)
  • 1 tbs vanilla extract
  • 3 ½ cups plus 2 teaspoons (445 grams) all-purpose flour
  • 1 ¼ teaspoons baking soda
  • 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoons salt
  • 1 ¼ pounds (565 grams) vegan dark chocolate, chopped into pieces

1) In a medium bowl, sift together the flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt.

2) Combine the shortening, light brown sugar, and white sugar at medium speed. Cream for 1-2 minutes, but be gentle since over-beating can lead to cakey cookies.

3) Whisk in the aquafaba and vanilla extract.

4) Fold in the flour mixture, and add the chopped chocolate when only streaks of flour remain. Stir the dough until there are no more streaks of flour; the dough might be a bit crumbly, but don’t worry.

5) Cover and refrigerate the dough for at least 12 hours, but ideally 24-36 hours.

6) Using a 1/3 cup measuring cup, divide the dough into ~18 portions. If the dough is a bit crumbly, gently mold the cookie dough balls into compact spheres so that they won’t fall apart. At this point, you can freeze the dough and bake individual portions as desired, or go ahead bake the dough right away.

7) Bake the cookie dough balls at 350 degrees for 13 minutes (15 minutes for frozen dough). They might look a bit underbaked in the middle, but will continue to cook for a bit even after they’re removed from the oven. Enjoy!

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Chocolate, Fig, & Roasted Walnut Milkshakes (dairy free. refined sugar free)

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I almost got in a fight over milkshakes once.

You see, in my humble and objectively correct opinion, milkshakes should be thick. Creamy enough to stir, but almost too thick to drink from a straw.

Apparently there are other ways to make “milkshakes” because a while ago I was sitting at lunch as my friend sloshed together milk and vanilla ice cream in a ratio that could only produce cold, barely sweet liquid with icy chunks. I asked him what monstrosity he was making, and he tried to tell me it was a milkshake. I (only half facetiously) called him a liar. I take frozen desserts very seriously.

This started a table-wide discussion on what makes the perfect milkshake, and also the start of my disillusionment with the world as I realized that most people I know prefer slurpable vs spoonable shakes.

So in a sort of compromise, I’m providing a milkshake recipe that can be tuned to your own preferences. Add more or less liquid, and the shake will be more or less thick. Magic.

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These milkshakes are far from traditional, but they’re delicious, and not in a health food substitution kind of way. If you’re a classic chocolate milkshake kinda person, just leave out the figs and sub in cashews for the walnuts, and it’ll be just as tasty. Sprinkle with granola to add the perfect crunch, and enjoy poolside or computer-side; I’ve done both.

Chocolate Fig & Walnut Milkshakes

Makes 4 large milkshakes

Note: To make classic chocolate milkshakes, increase the cashews to 1 cup, and leave out the walnuts and figs. 

In a pot bring 2 inches of water to a rolling boil. Add:

  • ½ cup raw cashews
  • ½ cup dried figs

Boil for 3 minutes, then drain. Add to a blender along with:

  • 3 cups non-dairy milk*
  • ½ cup toasted walnuts**
  • ½ cup dates
  • ¼ cup coconut palm sugar
  • ½ tsp stevia, or 2 tbs coconut palm sugar
  • ¼ cup cocoa powder***

Blend until completely smooth and creamy.

To make milkshakes, there are 2 options:

Option 1: Chill the mixture, and then churn in an ice cream maker for 20 minutes. This should create the perfect milkshake consistency. Thin with non-dairy milk as necessary.

Option 2: Pour the mixture into an ice cube mold, and freeze. Once completely frozen, add about half of the cubes to a blender with ~½ cup of non-dairy milk, and blend! Thin with milk as necessary.

Enjoy!

*The consistency of the final milkshakes will reflect the fat content of whatever non-dairy milk you use. Use canned coconut milk for very creamy (and a bit coconut-y) milkshakes, or unsweetened cashew milk to lighten them up. Rest assured that the milkshakes will be plenty creamy regardless of what milk you use; the whole cashews and walnuts guarantee this.

**Toast the walnuts in a saucepan at medium heat until fragrant, being careful not to burn them.

***I prefer dutch-processed, but any type should do. Reduce to 2 tablespoons for a fainter chocolate taste.

On a side note, I built a lightbox over the weekend to help me take more pictures. One of the problems I’ve encountered is that I do most of my cooking early in the morning or after the sun has set, both awkward times to take photos. With this lightbox, I have pretty good lighting regardless of the hour. Expect more recipes as a result.

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Vegan Pesto Cream Sauce

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In the many months since my last post, I learned something new about myself.  I’m lactose intolerant. Boo.

Apparently it’s common for people to produce less of the enzyme responsible for digesting lactose as they get older, but nevertheless I’m feeling a bit betrayed by my body. Betrayed and a bit in denial.

Luckily, I’ve also learned that there are some delicious (and simple!) replacements for traditional cream sauces: a prime example being this pesto cream sauce.

I was inspired by this recipe (cauliflower and cashews, brilliant!), but I made some alterations to cater it to my tastes. This sauce is so rich and hearty, but not heavy and cloying like many dairy-based sauces. I’ve made it twice so far, and shared it with enough people and kids to declare it picky eater approved. Lastly, don’t let the iphone photo with exactly 0 food styling dissuade you…it was so good I couldn’t wait to eat.

Now to figure out a way to make my favorite lasagna ever without cheese.

Vegan Pesto Cream Sauce

Makes ~2 ½ cups sauce

Bring a pot of water to a boil and add:

  • 1/3 cup raw cashews
  • 2 white mushrooms* (use 1 or omit if not fond of mushrooms)
  • 4 florets cauliflower, ~¾ cup

Boil for around 10 minutes, or until the cauliflower is soft. Next, strain the boiled mixture and add to a high speed blender with:

  • 1 cup unsweetened cashew or almond milk**
  • 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast***

Blend until completely smooth and then add:

  • 2-3 tablespoons non-dairy pesto****
  • salt, to taste

The sauce is ready! Heat up in a saucepan or microwave and add to pasta, gnocchi, vegetables, lasagna or whatever else you can think of.

Store any extra sauce in the fridge. It stores and reheats perfectly!

*I looove mushrooms and used baby bella mushrooms for the sauce pictured. I’ve also used shiitake.

** Be careful to not use vanilla cashew milk. The packaging is almost the same.

***I thought I despised nutritional yeast, but it turns out the brand I had tried (Bob’s Red Mill) has a very strong taste. I much prefer this brand.

****Most pestos have parmesan cheese, but I found a brand without any.

Melt-in-your-mouth Sweet Potato Brownies (gf. vegan. refined sugar-free) 

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7/28/16 edit: I wasn’t kidding when I said I’d make this recipe again. Go read about my sweet potato brownie adventures. It might (will definitely) make you question my sanity, but you can at least have confidence that this recipe is tried and tested.

If you prefer cakey or brownies with a lot of chew, these are not for you. They are so soft, fudgy, and just melt-in-your-mouth, even straight out of the fridge. If you love chocolate and want a damn good brownie that is healthy enough to eat for breakfast, these brownies are your calling.


Today I texted my friend “sweet potato oatmeal cookies, sweet potato brownies, or sweet potato crumble cake?”. Without missing a beat, she replied “sweet potato brownies”. Two hours later, I can confidently say she made the right choice.

When it comes to brownies, I am a firm believer that brownies should be fudgy, soft, and very chocolatey. Little is more disappointing than a dry or cakey brownie. These brownies are equally delicious warm from the oven (soft and melty) and straight out of the fridge (rich and fudgy).

Maple syrup provides caramel undertones that pair perfectly with the chocolate. The sweet potato adds natural sweetness, though its earthy flavor is completely masked by the chocolate.

I was wary while baking these brownies because over the summer I tried to make avocado brownies that were unbearably avocado-y (I keep seeing avocado chocolate cake recipes and even though the pictures look gorgeous, I am so damn skeptical), but I am happy to say that this is definitely a recipe that I will make again.

 

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Sweet Potato Brownies (vegan. gluten-free. refined sugar free)

Ingredients:

  • 6 oz raw sweet potato, sliced in 1/2 inch thick slices*
  • 1/2 cup maple syrup
  • 2 tbs vegetable or coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup dutch processed cocoa powder**
  • 1/4 cup carrot puree***
  • 40g oat flour (1/2 cup quick oats blended until powdery)
  • 1/2 tsp espresso powder
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 1/3 cup chocolate chips

Prep process:

To prepare the sweet potato, place in a microwave-safe bowl:

  • 6 oz raw sweet potato, sliced in 1/2 inch thick slices

Fill the bowl with water until the slices are fully submerged. Microwave for 6-8 minutes or until the slices are soft and can be pierced with a fork easily.

Drain the water, add a small drizzle of oil (only 1/4 to 1/2 tsp necessary; I gave them quick spray of cooking oil), and mash with the fork until no chunks remain. Be careful not to overwork the sweet potato while mashing, or the brownies will be gummy. Let the sweet potato cool to room temperature.

In a clean bowl stir together:

  • 1/2 cup maple syrup
  • 2 tbs vegetable or coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup + 2 tbs dutch processed cocoa powder
  • 1/4 cup carrot puree*

Add:

  • 40g oat flour (1/2 cup quick oats blended until powdery)
  • 1/2 tsp espresso powder
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 1/3 cup chocolate chips

Stir until smooth and glossy. Fold in in the cooled sweet potato.

Spread the batter into a greased 8×8 inch pan and bake at 350 degrees for 20-25 minutes.

Allow to cool before cutting into squares and serving. Serve warm with ice cream (soft and melty brownies) or chilled (soft and super fudgy brownies).

One last tip: These brownies are best treated like fudge. They can be kept at room temperature, but for clean cuts I recommend freezing the brownies for several hours and using a well greased knife.

Notes:

*I’ve tried this recipe with 3 oz to 7 oz of raw sweet potato. 3 oz produced super super fudge-y brownies that barely held their shape, which I loved, and 7 oz made brownies with a bit more bite, which was my mom’s preference. I felt the brownies with 6 oz of raw sweet potato was the perfect compromise, but feel free to vary the amount of sweet potato based on how much you available.

**I usually add an addition 2 tbs because I love the taste of dark chocolate.

**To make carrot puree, cover 4 ounces of 1 inch thick sliced carrots with water and microwave for 5 minutes, or until soft. To save time, microwave the carrots in the same bowl as the sweet potatoes and separate after. Strain the carrots, transfer to a blender or food processor with 1/2 cup of water or non-dairy milk, and blend until smooth. Measure out 1/4 cup for this recipe. I suspect pear sauce (the baby food kind) will also work well.

The Greatest Healthy Zucchini Cake (vegan)

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I’m banning modesty from this post. This zucchini cake deserves so much better than what modesty can afford it.

I’m a bit antsy to be posting a recipe for “The Greatest Healthy Zucchini Cake” after a recipe for “The Best Veggie Lasagna,” but I think that’s mainly caused by my lack of posts. Up until this zucchini bread, nothing I made inspired me enough to write about it.

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College has started up again, but because I’m living off campus I have my own kitchen. Lately I’ve been honing my healthy banana bread making skills (I’ve been taking a lot of bananas from my dining hall…), but that’s still a recipe in progress.

That’s, however, irrelevant. Back to what’s important.

This zucchini cake.

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This zucchini cake is soft, perfectly moist, and loaded with zucchini and chocolate chunks. It’s also really, really healthy as far as cake goes, made with only ¼ cup oil, no processed sugar, and sprouted spelt flour. (Truth be told I’m a bit surprised it turned out so well.) I also added a oatmeal crumble topping, which was probably one of my smartest ideas of the semester (besides faking LaTex, but that’s another story entirely).

I’m a huge fan of sharing food with others (well, except sushi. Sharing sushi tests my generosity), but I’m finding it really hard to convince myself to share these. This is my 2015 recipe. Really, really, really.

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The Greatest Zucchini Cake

In a bowl combine:

  • 1 ¾ cup shredded zucchini (1 large zucchini)
  • ¼ cup oil
  • ½ cup dry sweetener (I used erythritol, sugar or coconut palm sugar should also works)
  • 2 tbs buttermilk powder (or 1 tsp lemon juice to keep the recipe vegan)
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

Stir in:

  • 1 cup spelt flour (or regular all purpose flour)
  • ¼ tsp baking soda
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
  • (optional) ¼ cup chocolate chips

Pour batter in a greased 8×8 pan. In a small bowl combine:

  • ¼ cup spelt flour
  • 2 tbs instant oats
  • 2 tbs coconut palm sugar
  • 1 tbs coconut oil

Stir until a crumbly mixture forms, and then sprinkle on top of the batter. Bake for 30-35 minutes at 350 degrees, or until a knife comes out clean.

Vegan Peanut Butter Crumble Bars, Two Ways

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Two years ago I posted a recipe for Peanut Butter & Jelly bars.

At the end of the post I wrote: “If you’re gluten free or vegan, I’ll post a similar recipe that you can enjoy soon!”

Tada! It’s here.

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I’ve made these bars three times to work out little kinks in the recipe, and can say that for someone who generally doesn’t love peanut butter cakes or cookies, these bars are good.

One of my latest baking goal is making health(ier) desserts that are good enough to share, and not just something I can enjoy–looking at you super avocado-flavored brownies.–and these fit that criteria.

They’re soft, super peanut butter-y, and melt in your mouth…kind of like a cross between blondies and shortbread. I brought them to a fourth of july gathering with friends and they were all eaten, so that qualifies as a success to me!

Peanut Butter Bars (Vegan)

In a medium bowl combine:

  • ¼ cup almond flour
  • ¼ cup spelt flour (replace with oat flour to make gluten free)
  • 2 tbs sugar or erythritol
  • 1 tbs ground flax seeds
  • ¼ tsp baking powder
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 2 tbs peanut flour (optional–can replace with 2 tbs almond flour)

In a small bowl, microwave for 20 seconds and then stir until smooth:

  • 2 tbs maple syrup
  • 3 tbs peanut butter (decrease to 2 tbs if you added peanut flour)
  • 1 tbs melted coconut oil

Stir in:

  • ½ tsp vanilla extract

Add the liquid ingredients to the dry ingredients, and stir until combined. They should form a crumbly, but cohesive dough.

PB&J Option: 

Set aside ¼ cup of dough and press the rest of the dough into a small cake pan (about 6″ diameter) or ramekins.

Meanwhile combine in a microwave safe bowl:

  • 1 tbs strawberry jam
  • ½ cup frozen or fresh berries

Microwave, stirring every 20 seconds, until thick and gooey. It should take around 3-5 minutes. Spread on top of the dough, and then sprinkle with the remaining ¼ cup dough.

Bake at 350 degrees for 16-18 minutes. The very top of the bars should be lightly golden, but the bars shouldn’t appear totally baked through.

Chocolate Fudge Option:

Add to the dough:

  •  2 tbs chocolate chips

Set ¼ cup of the dough aside, and press the rest of the dough into a small cake pan (about 6″ diameter) or ramekins.

On top of the bars spread:

  • 3 tbs chocolate fudge sauce (I used this sugar free, fat free fudge sauce, but if you’re aiming for a purely vegan recipe, feel free to use otherwise)

Sprinkle the remaining ¼ cup of dough on top.

Bake at 350 degrees for 16-18 minutes. The very top of the bars should be lightly golden, but the bars shouldn’t appear totally baked through.

Asian Mushroom Potstickers

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I love dumplings.

I love the Czech fruit dumplings my grandmother makes, the Asian vegetable dumplings my mom and I inhale, and the Tibetan potato “momo” I have every time I visit home.

Despite my dumpling adoration, up until earlier this year I never attempted to make dumplings because I assumed it was a long and tedious process. To my surprise, dumpling making isn’t hard at all, and it’s especially nice because any leftovers can be freezed and used for easy meals.

I’ve still got ways to go before I master all the dumpling recipes I intend to (I think Czech fruit dumplings are up next), but I think I’ve got this mushroom potsticker recipe down. These dumplings are super simple to make, yet incredibly flavorful and delicious. I encourage anybody, regardless of cooking experience, to try this recipe out.

Asian Mushrooms Potstickers 

Dumpling Dough

Adapted from here.

  • 240 g flour*
  • ½ cup boiling water
  • ½ tsp salt
  1. Add the salt to the boiling water, and stir into the flour. Knead the dough for 10 minutes, or until smooth. (For more detailed instructions, see here.)
  2. Pat the dough into a log, wrap in plastic wrap, and set aside in the fridge to rest for at least an hour.

*This equals 2 cups of flour, but unless you have a feel for how much water to add, I would weigh it out if possible. I halved the recipe and used 60 g spelt flour, 50 g all purpose flour, and 10 g vital wheat gluten, but when I made it with 120 g all purpose flour, the dough was easier to handle.

Mushroom Potsticker Filling

Adapted from here.

In a pan, sautee until the water is mainly evaporated:

  • 1 ½ cups diced white mushrooms
  • ½ cup diced shiitake mushrooms*
  • 1 tsp oil
  • 1/8 tsp salt

Add, and cook another 2 minutes:

  • 2 cloves garlic, diced

Take off heat and stir in:

  • 2 tbsp minced green onions
  • 1 tbsp minced garlic
  • ½ tsp sesame oil
  •  ½ tsp soy sauce
  • (optional:  ½ tsp chili oil)

Assembling the potstickers:

  1. Cut the dough into 40 equally sized pieces (mine were 9g each), and roll into thin circles.
  2. Add dumpling filling to the middle, making sure the filling doesn’t touch the edges of the dough (the oil in the filling will prevent the sides from properly sealing).
  3. Fold the dough over the filling, and pinch the edges to trap the filling. The edges shouldn’t have a visible seam. Crimp the edges if desired.
  4. Set aside, covering with plastic wrap, as you prepare more dumplings. Either cook immediately, or place in a tupperware and freeze.

Cooking the potstickers:

See here for an in depth instructions on cooking potstickers. They are also good when boiled in broth.

Healthy Vegan S’more Cookies (made with…?)

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A few weeks ago I was mindlessly scrolling through /r/food when I realized that I genuinely miss posting recipes. I am always playing with ideas for new foods in my mind, but I’ve seldom had the time and motivation to create them.

This is in part because college makes time feel like a luxury, but also because I have had an unlimited supply of dining hall food.
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Well, summer has nullified both these things, for better or worse, and I have been itching to cook and bake the weird ideas that I’ve accumulated this past semester, starting with these vegan s’more cookies.

They’re soft, sweet, and delicious despite containing no cane sugar, eggs, or dairy. What do they have instead?

Garbanzo beans.

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It sounds weird, I know, but trust me, garbanzo beans are incredible.

Blended garbanzo beans create the perfect cookie base, and the liquid that comes with them can be whipped into a delicious (and vegan) marshmallow fluff. I promise there’s no catch. I’m still a little blown away myself.
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Vegan S’more Cookies 

Marshmallow Fluff:

  • liquid from 1 13.4 oz can of garbanzo beans (~½ cup liquid)
  • ¼ cup coconut sugar
  • ½ tsp vanilla extract
  1. To create the marshmallow fluff, beat the liquid from the can of garbanzo beans with an electric mixer or blender until foamy
  2. Slowly add the coconut sugar and keep beating for around 10-15 minutes, until the mixture thickens and looks like meringue.
  3. Try not to eat the entire bowl as you prepare the cookies 😉

Cookie base:

  • 1 ½ cups cooked garbanzo beans
  • ¼ cup sugar or coconut sugar (increase to 1/3 cup if you prefer sweeter desserts)
  • ¼ cup liquid sweetener such as agave or maple syrup
  • ¼ cup + 2 tbs unsweetened almond milk
  • 1 tbs oil
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • ½ cup spelt flour
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • ¼ tsp salt
  1. In a blender or food processor, combine the garbanzo beans, coconut sugar, liquid sweetener, unsweetened almond milk, sour cream and oil.
  2. Stir in the spelt flour, baking soda, and salt. Tada, that easy!

Assembling the cookies:

  1. Scoop 1/8 cup portions of the batter into a greased whoopie pie or cupcake pan. I used the former because I had one lying around, but I’m sure a cupcake pan would work too!
  2. Create an indentation in the middle of the batter and add a dollop of marshmallow cream on top.
  3. Sprinkle with chocolate chips.
  4. Bake the cookies at 350 degree for 12-15 minutes.
  5. Try and fail not to burn your tongue as you eat one straight out of the oven, then eat another ten minutes later when it’s semi cool-ish.
  6. Eat another one–just to make sure it’s still good (it is). Repeat.

A is for Apple Pie Cookies [vegan]

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I have this idea in my head, an idea which I’ve been considering for the past few weeks.  Since one of my New Year resolutions was to, I quote: “Bake different styles of food!,” I’ve obviously got to follow through on that!

To accomplish this resolution, my idea is: Desserts Around the World-alphabet style

Basically, every two weeks I will post a new recipe that originates from a foreign country.  Simple enough right?  The only other criteria is that there are going to be a total of 26 recipes, and each recipe name will begin with a letter in the alphabet.

To start myself off, here’s a recipe for Apple Pie Cookies, with the country being AMURICAAA.

These are essentially cinnamon oatmeal cookies, with an apple pie filling and a simple icing on top.  The cookies have almost a biscuity texture, which really enhances the idea of an apple pie.  These cookies are made for eating with a glass of milk (I’d even go as far as to say glasses of milk are made for drinking with these cookies), and if you’re aiming for a totally vegan dessert, a glass of soymilk is perfect too.  Eat these cookies to celebrate the United States- a mess of a country, but one built on honest ideals.

Apple Pie Cookies

For the cookies:

  • ½ cup butter (I used vegan butter)
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • ½ tsp vanilla
  • 1 cup quick oats
  • 1 cup flour (reduce to ¾ cup for a less biscuity cookie)
  • 1 tbs corn starch
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp cinnamon
  • ½ tsp salt
  1. Cream together the butter and brown sugar.  Whisk in the vanilla.
  2. In a separate bowl, combine the oatmeal, flour, corn starch, baking powder, salt and cinnamon.
  3. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ones, and stir until a dough forms.  Refrigerate for at least 1 hour.
  4. Take ¼ cup size balls of dough, and form into round disks on a baking sheet. Make an indent in the middle of each disk as a bowl for the apple filling.

For the apple filling:

  • 1 apple, peeled and diced
  • ¼ cup brown sugar
  • ½ tsp cinnamon
  • 2 tbs butter
  1. Melt the butter in the pan, and add the brown sugar.  Heat until bubbling.
  2. Add the apples, and cook until they begin to soften. Reduce the heat and keep cooking until the apples caramelize and the filling is deep golden brown. Cook less for a more gooey filling (in my cookies, I cooked the filling until very golden brown, and it was almost like a chewy apple caramel in the final product).  Divide the filling among the cookies.
  3. Bake the cookies for about 12-15 minutes at 350 degrees, or until they are a light golden color.  Cool completely before adding the glaze.

For the icing:

  • ¼ cup powdered sugar
  • 1 tiny splash vanilla
  • milk (or soy milk)
  1. In a plastic bag combine the powder sugar and vanilla.
  2. Add a tiny splash of milk, and squish the bag until a homogenous icing forms.  If needed, add another tiny splash of milk.
  3. Cut a corner off of the bag and pipe the icing onto the cookies.
  4. Allow the icing to harden, then enjoy the cookies with a glass of milk.

Healthy Chocolate Pudding Pie [vegan]

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(Healthy) Chocolate Pudding Pie-Vegan 

A few years ago I made a batch of tofu chocolate pudding and was absolutely enamored with it.  It was SO simple to make and I ended up eating a whole batch, thinking tofu automatically made it a health food (not that you can taste more than a hint of soy).  Flash forward to a couple months ago, when I saw a recipe for a Chocolate Bar Pie on a wonderful (healthy) dessert blog called Chocolate Covered Katie (she has recipes which make even me LOVE garbanzo beans). Yum yum yum!

I realized, looking at her gorgeous pictures, that my life called for some serious tofu chocolate pie.  Not one to follow recipes, I kinda took a glance at the recipe on CCK, and ended up guessing ingredients and their amounts.  To my surprise, it was a experimental success (trust me, my experiments aren’t usually so pretty, haha).  I made a chocolate shortbread crust for the pie, and it complemented the silkiness of the filling really nicely.  I would continue rambling about the pie (and I could, believe me!), but it’s five in the morning (hello jetlag, you have too much power over me), and I think I should go back to sleep.  G’night or good morning, and until next time!

Chocolate Tofu Pie

Inspiration from Chocolate Covered Katie’s Chocolate Bar Pie

Crust:

  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • ¼ cup cocoa powder
  • ½ cup powdered sugar
  • 1 pinch salt
  • ½ cup (1 stick) butter [vegan butter, if desired]
  1. Add the flour, cocoa, sugar, and salt in a large bowl.
  2. Cut the stick of butter into thin slices, and add to the bowl.
  3. With your finger, work the butter into the dry ingredients until a crumbly dough forms.
  4. Press the dough into a greased pie pan, and bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes.
  5. Allow to cool completely.

Filling:

  • 1 container of silken tofu, 16 ounces, drained
  • 1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips (half a 12 ounce bag)
  • ¼ cup cocoa powder
  • ¼ cup powdered sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1 pinch salt
  1. Melt the chocolate chips, and stir until smooth.
  2. Place all the ingredients in a blender and process until smooth.  Easy peasy!
  3. Pour into the cooled pie shell and refrigerate until the filling holds its shape.
  4. Garnish with chocolate shavings and fresh berries. 🙂

EDIT: Gave a slice to my friend who’s really finicky about Tofu and she liked it.  Success!